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Documenting sea turtle rescue and rehabilitation.
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Lost Sharks of San Francisco Bay

A young researcher in pursuit of forgotten sharks.
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High-altitude Archaeolgy - August 2017

Our August 2017 expedition plans to conduct an expanded archaeological survey, including a series of dives at extreme elevation, to investigate, map, and document pre-Incan/Incan ruins and artifacts in and around Laguna Sibinacocha located at 16,000 ft in the Peruvian Andes. Our expedition will utilize an OpenROV remotely operated vehicle (ROV) to document ruins and artifacts that we have already discovered in the lake, and to investigate and document new underwater sites, including those too deep for diving at such extreme altitudes. The ROV will also help target new dive sites, conserving the limited diving gas we’ll have at this remote location. An unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) will be used to facilitate pedestrian surveys and to map the terrestrial findings and the surrounding landscape features.

Recent Observations

Preston up to bat processing fish. Biologists rotate every 10 fish for accuracy and cold fingers.Preston will call out: species, fork length (mm), weight (g), fish condition, if a PIT tag is present, what the mark ID is/if present, and whether it's a new or recapture and the corresponding photo number. I record this info when I'm not puttering around on OpenExplorer. Woo!

It's been a month since this project has started, and in the interim, as part of this internship, the team members are each responsible for drafting grant proposals centered around ROV-related projects. I’m really proud of the team’s creativity, so be sure to check back in for updates as we move forward. However, as of March 21s, we’re finally getting started with the actually construction of our ROV! I'm pleased to announce that our OpenROV v2.8 kit has finally arrived. We've begun working on the first construction module; the team and I learned a lot about acrylic and solvent welding. For example, you don’t technically glue acrylic, you use a solvent to weld pieces together. Along the way my interns and I will be learning how to solder, work with circuit boards, and trouble-shoot any and all issues related to the construction and deployment of an ROV. And the clock is already ticking! We’ve got just a few short months before the Edwards Lab takes off for our last Aleutians cruise, and we’ve already got big plans for little Pegasus.

Who knows why we get the urge to explore, or why we perpetually expand upon what is accessible. The long-pondered allure of subterranean waterways came to mind once again, as it has for years. On Friday, April 21- A small team of engineers, ROV enthusiasts and explorers are taking an OpenROV Trident to a flooded and shut down mine shaft in Jackson, California. Nobody on this trip has sent an ROV into a labyrinth of tunnels before. The excitement is childlike. Located at the foothills of the Sierra Nevada Mts, Kennedy Goldmine is tapped into the 'Mother Lode', a mineral-intense region from 1.5 to 6 kilometres (0.93 to 3.73 mi) wide and 190 kilometres (120 mi) long, extending from El Dorado County on the north, south to Mariposa County. I called and talked to the operator of the historic landmark: It is currently flooded all the way up to its entryway, at ground level. Operational gold mine between 1848 and 1942. During wartime conservation the gov't mandated all single-ore mines shut down to conserve labor for more productive multi-ore mines. While it was running, they had to pump out 1,000 gallons per hour, 24/7 to keep the shafts from flooding. Maximum depth is 1500 meters. Nothing is known of its layout, there are no records available that would help us extrapolate what it is like inside. Total mine output was 1.7 million ounces of gold. Above the mine, they used to smelt gold ore into bars, that would be transported to San Francisco via Wells Fargo. Using the ROV, we are going to try to get a good sense of the layout of the tunnels. The goal of this dive beyond scratching a curious itch is to learn how to best navigate in an underwater labyrinth environment. The tunnels are [assumed] very small, not always level or straight, with many forks and branches. This is going to be a good challenge. Using visual cues from the camera feed, depth and gyro position, we are going to employ our geospatial visualization skills to form an idea of a day in the life of the working mine. This first excursion will likely only take up the first half of the day, leaving plenty of energy left to explore other caves in the region, of which there are plenty. One nearby cave with an underground lake, that had inspired a great deal of ambition and excitement around it, is run by a private tour company that requires we rent the entire premises to explore its waters, which is unfortunately beyond our means. It is part of the Calaveras cave network - Black Chasm Cave, California Cavern and Moaning Cavern. As none of us on this trip are acquainted with the cavernous foothills, and non-commercial cave openings are not easy to find online, we may simply ask locals where we can find what we are looking for - which is a deep mysterious hole, preferably with water. Part 1: Mine shaft -> Planned out very concisely, ready to execute. Part 2: We don't know yet. We will most likely end up just taking a regular cave tour (which definitely won't suck) and hoping that they will let us carry that Pelican case in after all.

Yesterday our school hosted an Earth Day event for students and their families. This provided an opportunity to let people fly OpenROV #3536 and learn about how we're going to be using it in Guadeloupe. We equipped the ROV with a water sampler - a niskin bottle - and let the people take samples. This allowed us to talk to them about types of water pollution and how we test for them....but most of the questions I fielded were about the OpenROV and its capabilities. We had people of all ages and backgrounds using the ROV. Here are some adorable photos of a two year old controlling it. She got pretty good at up and down, but will need practice to get the hang of the left joystick, Niskin Bottle: Oceanography for Everyone

Mid October 2016, the Octopus Foundation returned to the Italian island of Lampedusa to help the "Lampedusa Turtle Rescue". Once again, we decided to attach the Olympus camera (Tough TG-Tracker) on the back of a marine turtle for half an hour. This time, it is a 34kg specimen that takes us for a ride. Link to the Lampedusa Turtle Rescue Link to the TG Tracker camera

Back in Sydney After a long night with 4 flights, 2 of them red eye flights, I'm back in Sydney. A great trip for sure. More debriefing will follow.

Louisiana Universities Marine Consortium (LUMCON) operates an Environmental Monitoring Program with stations that include both meteorological as well as water quality instrumentation in Terrebonne Bay. LUMCON’s monitoring stations offer real-time in-situ coastal environmental data that is available to the scientific community and the general public. While stationary monitoring stations are excellent for collecting long-term time-series data sets, an OpenROV Trident carrying a mini-CTD payload would be ideal for conducting transects and collecting pressure, temperature, conductivity, nutrient, chlorophyll and dissolved oxygen data over a larger area within Terrebonne bay. A Trident/CTD can be used in areas that are inaccessible to a conventional motor vessel. Another advantage of a Trident/CTD system would be collection of water quality data in 3 dimensions by combining horizontal transects with an undulating motion of diving and ascending, in effect creating an undulating CTD without the need for a motor vessel to tow the system and create disturbances in the water column ahead of the CTD. Utilizing real time sensor information we can make the data instantly accessible which allows for easy dissemination of crucial small scale events occurring on a bay wide basis in a time frame that allows for immediate action by interested parties.For summer of 2017, LUMCON’s Environmental Monitoring Program has approached YSI/Xylem concerning purchasing or obtaining a demo EXO1 4-port data sonde with pressure, temperature, conductivity, and dissolved oxygen probes. LUMCON would like to design a mount for an EXO1 sonde, experiment with flight patterns to determine the most efficient speed and pattern for covering the water column along a transect, as well as assess the feasibility of mapping hypoxia across all of Terrebonne bay. (Figure 1. from Batker et al. 2010, Earth Economics)

Channelkeeper expedition with our AnacapaROV - Very successful ocean testing after initial testing in the bathtub and a swimming pool. With our connection to the Santa Barbara Channelkeeper we were offered the opportunity to test the ROV in unison with the educational expertise of the Channelkeeper staff with their "human ROV". They sent divers down with live video and sound and we were able to interact with them and ask questions. We then explored the local Santa Barbara Mohawk Reef just south of Mesa Lane beach and had a spider crab attack the OpenROV. The lights, lasers and motors performed successfully.

Our expedition in coastal Louisiana will in many ways be an analog of our deep-sea experiments investigating wood fall communities. In May of 2017 we will deploy 200 wood packages at 5 sites, 2,000 meters deep in the Gulf of Mexico. Identical wood packages will be deployed in a transect from land to open ocean in Terrebonne Bay with the goal of conducting parallel experiments. Using the OpenROV we will gather environmental data at our experimental sites and conduct frequent visual inspections to learn more about the ecology of wood on sea floor ecosystems in the shallow water habitats of Louisiana. The Trident ROV would be used primarily as a tool to conduct site inspections in an effort to create a time series documentation of the biological and physical associations that a food and structure source creates in shallow water coastal communities. Not only would the Trident be an observation platform for the experimental arrays of wood packages but it would also be invaluable for the discovery of natural wood deposits associated with storm events and coastal erosion. Accessibility to wood fall experiments allow for an in depth investigation of several research questions that can only be addressed with regular video surveys. These include multi-species interactions, habitat use by transient mobile fauna, predator-prey dynamics, encrusting habitat enhancement, regular structure associations, and physical enhancement of benthic habitats. The use of a Trident ROV gives us a freedom unknown for these kinds of manipulative ecological experiments. Knowledge gained from the type of work described above would then enable us to plan a larger scale investigation that would seek to tie metabolic energetics along transects of differing community and resources gradients in the coastal marshes of Louisiana. Potential to develop a strong research program using the Trident ROV allows us to couple multiple lines of research that ultimately would answer basic questions of habitat heterogeneity, linkages between ecosystem structure and function and constrain aspects of the metabolic theory of ecology.

The unique and highly productive Louisiana marine ecosystem is made up of vast coastal wetlands of both abandoned and active deltas that meet the Gulf of Mexico. These productive waters in turn create some of the most productive fisheries in the world. The sheer amount and diversity of life in the teeming coastal waters of Louisiana is hard for many fathom. With an OpenROV Trident, we will bring this underwater diversity to students first hand, while engaging them with exploration and data collection that captures fish population structure and behaviors around structures in a variety of habitats and across seasons.

The last thing I expected when I visited Thoreau’s famous Walden Pond was to find jellyfish. But small, nickel-sized jellies were teaming in the cold October water, underneath a canopy of red and gold leaves. As a scientist who studies jellyfish, I desperately wanted to learn more about these odd freshwater jellies, so I returned to the pond with my high-tech equipment: a net, collecting jars, and a bright green pool noodle. I floated around, freezing, on the noodle for nearly an hour before I found the jellies. These small, clear jellies weren’t spread evenly over the pond like I’d thought; instead, they were all clumped in a single bay at the surface, not far from the stone remnants of Thoreau’s cabin. Though I collected a number of jellies, they did not breed successfully in captivity, and within a few weeks all the jellies in Walden Pond were gone. My chance to study the freshwater jellies that year had passed. Though freshwater jellies seem elusive, they are all over the United States, often appearing and disappearing with little notice. Even though they’ve been reported in 44 of the 48 contiguous united states, we know very little about these animals. For example, all the animals I observed were grouped together in a small area of the lake. Do they passively concentrate in certain parts of a lake, or like the famous golden lagoon jellies on Palau, do they actively migrate throughout the day? If we can locate freshwater jellies effectively, and in multiple different lakes, we’ll have a much better chance of answering these questions. However, floating on a pool noodle in cold water simply is not an effective strategy for finding and studying freshwater jellies. I propose to study freshwater jellyfish, in collaboration with citizen scientists, using a Trident ROV. We will use the ROV to locate jellies in multiple lakes, and examine their distribution and daily movement patterns. Once we find jellies, I will collect them for further study in the lab. I will conduct this work in conjunction with an outreach campaign with the local community. I will alert citizens to the general presence of freshwater jellyfish through op-eds in local newspapers, flyers, and public talks. Citizens will report sightings to me via email or through our expedition webpage, and I will invite them to join me in the field as we locate freshwater jellies with the Trident ROV. With the aid of a Trident ROV and citizen science, we will be able to study these strange and beautiful animals, and hopefully catalyze interest in freshwater jellies and local freshwater ecology throughout the region. (photos: Number 1: The old "old way" of collecting jellies in a pond with a pool noodle Number 2: A freshwater jellyfish, from Wikimedia commons)

The Center for Great Lakes Literacy, Great Lakes Sea Grant Network and U.S. Environmental Protection Agency will host 15 4th-12th grade teachers and non-formal educators to work beside scientists performing Great Lakes research July 8-14, 2017. Stops in ports (including the NOAA Thunder Bay National Marine Sanctuary) will include additional science experiences. The workshop will offer first-hand explorations of Lake Huron ecology, geology, geography, weather and biogeochemical processes, with particular emphasis on human impacts. Participants will collect planktonic and benthic organisms as well as conduct water quality data collection and analysis. Part of this research experience will demonstrate to teachers how ROVs can be used for scientific work. One difficulty in assessing fish abundance and distribution in the Great Lakes is sampling on rocky substrates, because bottom trawling isn’t feasible. There is particular interest in assessing round goby abundance on these habitats to get a better idea of what their potential ecological impacts could be and whether or not they have displaced native species, such as mottled or slimy sculpin, for example. The research team is excited to use the OpenROV Trident to examine these areas where typical sampling methods can’t be used.

The OpenROV V 2.8 had some technical issues and was not used for approximately two years. We got him back to work and tested him in fresh water on the campus of the Kiel university and in the Kiel fjord.

The Adler Planetarium's Far Horizons Program has one mission: bring real space exploration down to Earth and into the hands of students, volunteers, and the public. On Monday, February 6, 2017, around 1:30am CST, a bit of space literally came to Earth and splashed down in our own backyard! Enthused by the hands on science this brings teens of Chicago, and the ability to collaborate with scientists across fields, the planning for this expedition began. All parties involved understand the difficulty of this task, the "needle in a haystack" odds of this endeavor, and it drives us all the more to challenge teens of Far Horizons to engineer innovative ways to find and retrieve these meteorites. The STEM Professionals that work and volunteer in the Far Horizons Lab offer our team of teens helpful insights with their design concepts. Astronomers from The Adler Planetarium, and founding members of Far Horizons, Dr. Mark Hammergren and Dr. Shane Larson, enrich our student's understanding of the space science that brought this meteorite to our own back door.Dr. Philipp R. Heck, meteoritics expert from The Field Museum, has given our team insight into the possible make up of these meteorites and ways to detect them. Marc Fries, a scientist from NASA, and a colleague of Dr. Philipp R. Heck, calculated the radar data from the meteorite's path and has created a map that predicts locations of the meteorites (and size distribution), which will prove crucial in our hunt. We are also consulting with the Senior Research Biologist of the Shedd Aquarium, Dr. Philip Willink, to understand the environment of the lake bottom. Dr. WIllink is interested in this expedition, not only for a chance to find hunks of rock from space, but also to capture data of the lake floor that have not been clearly mapped in the past. In 2003, a similar sized meteorite landed in Chicago, many of the larger fragments were around the size of softballs. The image below crashed through a Chicagoans roof and landed in their laundry! Dr. Philipp R. Heck assumes, from the size and color of the fireball that we are dealing with a similar size and make up of the Park Forest Meteorite (image seen below, Adler Planetarium). This spring we'll continue to consult with experts as we prepare for our Meteorite Hunt scheduled for the summer (July/August). Everyone involved has a lot to learn from each other as the task of underwater meteorite recovery is rarely undertaken. We look forward to sharing with the Open Explorer Community, build Far Horizon's first OpenROV (to explore Far Horizons of the deep!) and welcome all interested explorers in the Great Lakes region who have access to equipment to join the search. We'll learn a lot from this journey, and hope you will too. Deep Dives! Chris Bresky Far Horizons Teen Programs Specialist Adler Planetarium

A brief update; we conducted a couple of test immersions in the Baga river, and then tagged along with TerraConscious on one of their eco-friendly dolphin boat rides out on the Arabian Sea, where Matsya was introduced to seawater for the first time. The water was murky, but she dived to the seabed (at a very shallow 10m of depth) and everything worked well. There were no leaks and aside from a few data-glitches on the IMU, all the components worked! I've taken a few segments from the footage recorded by Matsya's camera, and compiled them into a short (~1min) video which should be available below. Next up: Fixing the port motor, finding a source of replacement motors in India, painting the OpenROV frame in a high-visibility colour (so she can be easily located when she surfaces) and getting things in place for future dives.

One of the targets for exploration on our next expedition is a large spring formed by a sinkhole that is located about 600ft/200m above the lake (at 16,600ft/5092m) and at a potentially important location. It's about 30ft/10m deep and such locations were (and are) often considered sacred sites in the Andean cultures. Often called "ojos" or 'eyes', they sometimes received offerings, which were thrown into them. In the photo you see below, the nearly 20,000ft (6100m) mountain of Jatunriti can be seen in the background. The water that flows from its rapidly-receding glacier feeds the lake and, eventually, the Amazon river itself. Since our limited diving gas is precious up there, and our dive gear has to move around on horses, the ROV will be critical for this site. We'll be able to explore the spring to determine if anything might be down there and therefore, if we should even attempt to dive at the site. Diving at these altitudes is serious business. One concern I have are the aquatic plants growing around the edges and walls of the spring. Does anyone have experience with operating an OpenROV around aquatic vegetation? How much of a concern is prop-fouling? If the the propellers do foul, are they easily cleared without damaging the motors?

Testing the wiring harness. And with that, the teardown is complete and we are ready to begin the rebuild!

After going over our experience of yesterday we have concluded that this experience is super special. Without the grant and knowledge of our super dedicated teacher we would have never got the chance to do anything like this. Cale and I had so much fun. We cannot wait to go diving again. We are thinking of going to the river at one of our favorite spots.

Can I date post in the past? I have a lot of things I would like to post retrospectively.

Two Wisconsin middle school teachers and two of their students are planning to join NOAA researchers onboard the R/V Storm on Friday, June 2, 2017, as they use multibeam sonar to map the northern lakebed of the proposed Wisconsin-Lake Michigan National Marine Sanctuary. The teachers previously participated on a Center for Great Lakes Literacy Shipboard Science Workshop aboard the S/V Denis Sullivan, the world's only re-creation of a three-masted 19th Century Great Lakes schooner. While onboard the R/V Storm, the teachers and their students will use an OpenROV Trident to document lakebed habitat and explore one of the shipwrecks located within the proposed marine sanctuary. One of the teachers, Lynn Kurth of Prairie River Middle School in Merrill, Wis., is working with Wisconsin Sea Grant and the Wisconsin Environmental Education Board to create a free ROV loan program for Wisconsin teachers using the OpenROV Trident. Overall Project Background: Mapping, Environmental, and Socioeconomic Assessments to Support the Proposed Wisconsin-Lake Michigan National Marine Sanctuary The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science are working with NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and state and local partners to compile data and map important lake resources and historic shipwrecks of western Lake Michigan, and also to improve our understanding of the relationships between these resources and coastal communities. Data and assessments will support the management of the proposed Wisconsin-Lake Michigan sanctuary. Why We Care In December 2014, the state of Wisconsin nominated an 875 square mile area of western Lake Michigan as a national marine sanctuary. This is a special nomination because there haven’t been any new sanctuaries designated since 2000. This proposal was made through a new community-based Sanctuary nomination process, and it is only the second sanctuary to be proposed within the Great Lakes. The proposed Wisconsin-Lake Michigan National Marine Sanctuary has deep ties to nearby communities since it encompasses a key portion of an early transportation corridor that was critical to the expansion of the United States and the development of the agricultural and the industrial core of the Nation. The nominated area contains an extraordinary collection of 37 known shipwrecks, 18 of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and a reported 80 which are yet to be discovered. Designation of a national marine sanctuary will expand the legacy of Wisconsin’s maritime archaeology preservation program, help conserve the largest freshwater system in the world, expand recreational and tourism opportunities, and provide education opportunities and job skills for the next generation. What We Are Doing This three-year project includes mapping, ecological and socioeconomic assessments that, together, will improve our understanding of the nominated region’s maritime heritage, ecology and coastal communities. This project will locate shipwrecks and important habitats, characterize water quality and living resources, document which of Lake Michigan’s resources and ecosystem services are most valuable to communities, and identify the conditions of environmental and social parameters linked to the successful management of maritime heritage resources. Some of these data will come from existing sources and will be synthesized for interpretation. Other data, notably remotely sensed lakebed data and socioeconomic data, will be newly acquired. The National Centers for Coastal Ocean Science are coordinating this project with NOAA’s Office of National Marine Sanctuaries and local partners, including local municipalities, the Wisconsin Historical Society and other state agencies, Wisconsin Sea Grant, the University of Wisconsin, and the NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory. Additional Information NCCOS Project Details https://coastalscience.noaa.gov/projects/detail?key=285 Proposed NOAA Wisconsin-Lake Michigan National Marine Sanctuary http://sanctuaries.noaa.gov/wisconsin/ Wisconsin's Great Lakes Shipwrecks http://www.wisconsinshipwrecks.org/ NOAA Great Lakes Environmental Research Laboratory https://www.glerl.noaa.gov/

Debrief The ice has now melted on Collins Bay, and the ground is starting to thaw out. It will soon be time for more shoreline explorations, but without ice! Some improvements to make on the robot are: Ensure there is threadlock on the set screws Use a longer rope for tether Add flotation devices to robot (just in case) Make a waterproof battery box (just in case) Take still photos on the camera in addition to video; sometimes the footage was a little shaky to get a sharp screen grab Have a handle on the robot for carrying (already done!) Have a smoother pan up/down option instead of directly controlling with joystick Custom wheels for ice A key item we noticed was we should really use the robot's point of view to its advantage. This means taking more photos and videos of the ground underneath, as well as the plants and stunning horizon view. Also, it would have been better if we started out earlier in the day. By the time it was the end and I recorded the outro, it was so dark you couldn't see me. Bringing a tripod next trip is necessary to capture another view point and reduce shake... especially when it's cold outside. All in all, it was an interesting journey to bring the robot into such cold weather and operate it on ice! We can almost dream of glacier explorations... Maybe one day! Special thanks to the Open Explorer community for following this expedition and commenting. It's been nice to share the journey with all of you Here's how you can be a part of Robot Missions! Join in your local shoreline cleanup Support our continuing efforts on Patreon Like us on Facebook for upcoming Field Tests Follow us on Twitter for news

Through subtidal survey we are surveying key eelgrass (Zostera marina) habitat in distinct areas of the San Francisco Bay, critical for many species of invertebrates, fish and marine animals. Applying data acquired by LIDAR and direct survey we will evaluate changes in densities of eelgrass densities and direct impact as a measure of benthic health and changes in Bay and ocean conditions. A combined public outreach and education project with the National Park Service and Romberg Tiburon Center will help communicate the importance of benthic ecosystems in the Bay, and better understand elasmobranch natural history and movements inside the estuary.

It's a race to confirm the new theory! "Beyond Grand Marais, the Brule River splits at the Devil’s Kettle waterfall. Half of it tumbles down and continues on its way. The rest pours into a dark deep hole in the hill ... and disappears. For years, people have tried to figure out where that water goes. Logs and Ping-Pong balls tossed into the churning cauldron seemed to simply vanish, fueling speculation that the lost branch of the river might flow for miles underground, carrying bobbing debris down to the distant shores of Lake Superior or off to some underground cavern. Now, finally, a researcher from the Minnesota Department of Natural Resources (DNR) thinks he’s cracked the riddle of Devil’s Kettle. “It’s a beautiful optical illusion,” said DNR mapping hydrologist Jeff Green, who first marveled at the wandering waterway during a family trip to Judge C.R. Magney State Park years ago. The disappearing half of the river, it turns out, reappears pretty quickly downstream." http://www.startribune.com/scientists-think-they-ve-solved-the-mystery-of-devil-s-kettle-falls/414996694/

On March 1st, the Viking Explorers took a trip to the Riverhead Aquarium. We watched a sea lion show, saw sharks in the shark tank, and experienced butterflies like never before at their butterfly exhibit. We visited a bird aviary, where exotic birds like parakeets became our companions, even landing on our heads! We also were able to put our ROVs in a fish habitat called The Lagoon. The ROVs captured many interesting videos of fish including the sea robin, which has limbs attached to its body that "walk" on the bottom of the habitat. We used GoPros to capture the footage in The Lagoon. Some students went on a behind the scenes tour of the aquarium and saw how the aquarium was ran. Overall the explorers had a great time and had an amazing experience at the Riverhead Aquarium.

According to a report by the United Nation Food and Agricultural Association, Malaysia is the 9th largest shark fishing nation and has risen to become ranked 3rd globally for shark fin imports. This small nation is having a serious impact on global shark populations in the Coral Triangle, as well as overfishing as much as 90% of its own shark population. However, a strong local movement centered in Sabah Borneo Malaysia is speaking up for sharks and increasing protection. Shark Stewards is supporting this work on the ground in Malaysia helping assess shark fishing, the shark fin trade and conduct a shark survey to determine impacts on sharks and rays. With the Sabah Shark Protection Association, we are striving for increased shark protection, stopping the flow of shark fins and creating marine protected areas for sharks and other species in Malaysian Borneo. Our Shark Shepherd collaboration with marine artist Ben Von Wong working for a no shark and ray fishing policy in Malaysia and supporting dive ecotourism with support from the Ministry of Tourism. Sign the petition. Shark fin soup is widely consumed in the major cities of Malaysia, and Sabah is the major destination for cheap and endangered seafood for Chinese tourists. Shark fins are sold on the streets and in the alleys and finned sharks are evident in all the large fish landings. The fins are sold first, although the meat is generally unpalatable and rendered into lower grade products like fish meal and fish balls. Read an excerpt from our National Geographic Ocean Views blog. Now in the fourth year, the project also is filming a series called Borneo From Below, an online “Funservation” program on marine life produced by the local media production company ScubaZoo. With host Aaron “Bertie” Gekoski the series is adventurous, humorous, and at times like this, dead serious. As part of the series, we are continuing a fish market survey we assisted with the Malaysian non profit Tropical Reef and Conservation Centre (TRACC) to determine how common sharks and rays are being caught here. We are also diving and filming sharks and following the shark from the reef to the plate. This episode is about coral catsharks, but we are finding it more challenging to find them alive than dead. There is increasing concern that Malaysia is adding shark fins to the top of the list of the country's record of wildlife trafficking and trade of illegal wildlife parts like rhino horn, elephant tusk and bear and tiger products. However, media attention is supporting champions in the country and helping bolster Sabah's interest in protecting the environment and supporting dive tourism to save sharks. Restoring and Protecting Reef Habitat Protecting marine habitat is also critical to help save sharks and marine ecosystems here in the Coral Triangle. Dynamite fishing is one of the prevalent factors causing reef destruction. Our work with our partners at TRACC on Pom Pom island is restoring coral reefs, assessing fish populations and reintroducing ground shark species as a pilot conservation project. Students from the University of San Francisco and volunteer divers are helping rebuild reefs with artificial reef structures, and conducting fish surveys to determine efficacy. Preliminary Results During 2015 & early 2016, the local village community divers and the TRACC international volunteers have built a wide range of different reefs at a variety of different sites on Kalapuan island in the Semporna district. In 2016 367 bottle reefs were constructed and installed with approximately 3500 hard and soft corals. The bottle reef system is composed of reef friendly cement, sand reinforced with mild steel, and recycled bottles to provide a solid substrate for coral settlement, reef stabilization and coral planting. As part of the trial we also constructed 12 large turtle reefs; 2 igloos; 12 deep reefs planted with gorgonians and sea fans and over 1500 corals in the nursery. We also built several large bommie / tetris reef structures as a trial of techniques. Many of the bottle and turtle bommie reefs were built and positioned on the Kalapuan community reef site during the Kalapuan environmental and coral planting days. Please support our work so we can help our partners fight for their vanishing sharks and coral reefs. Shark Stewards is a non profit project of the Earth Island Institute.

Better late than never, right? Sometimes work gets in the way of fun. In my last post, I was hoping to have nice weather for tossing the drone up in the air. Well...nope. Turns out it got really cold and windy instead. But we're all intrepid explorers, right? We push on. Despite the lake being choppy and stirring up a lot of silt, I was able to accomplish part of my goals for the day. The hope was to orient using some previous GPS waypoints, and see if we could locate any structures underwater. That obviously was not possible. However, I was able to shoot a lot of photos, and re-orient to the new topography. This was the first time I had been up to the northern(ish) end of the lake since it had flooded and refilled last summer. Turns out, catching 12-15 ft of water can really change the way things look (the northern end of the lake is flatter and shallower, so the water really spreads out). I realized my original plan of hauling gear out in my 17ft canoe, and anchoring on site, will probably not work. The town's location is out in a highly trafficked area, and no longer near the bank...more right out in the middle. I am considering hauling the stuff out to the island and putting that 300ft tether to work. We'll see. Dive time is here. Just need a free weekend with some good weather. Coming soon. (In the photo below, the bridge site should be about 100 yards towards the camera from a point directly between the two islands)

Progress we will be going out to Milos end of may to conduct UAV surveys and radiation mapping as well as underwater photogrammetry surveys.

To develop and test a payload for exciting and imaging fluorescence in corals by means of a proxy for health. Working with Bristol University, Cabot institute, Plymouth Marine laboratory and Roddenberry foundation

This time I didn't design everything from scratch, but used the OpenROV design for the mechanics (Electronics and software I did myself however). And for a change the ROV is still in good shape after it's maiden voyage! I plan to perform some upgrades in time for this summer vacation, and hopefully be able to do some proper exploring. During the testing of this ROV I saw cod, cuckoo wrasse, star fish, and sea urchins.

Vacuums, bathtubs and missile silos... That was our sequence of testing. Using an Automotive vacuum test pump we connected to the main electronic cylinder and pulled as much of a vacuum as we could-- roughly 80kpa-- not sure what that translates to in terms of depth. But, importantly it held that measure for 30 minutes without lessening. (I read that stability is more important that vacuum pressure in this kind of test.) Next, we submerged the rov in the bathtub and learned about the keyboard and gamepad controls. Wow is the video nice. The clarity of our and a razor we more than we could have hoped for! More importantly, after an hour of soaking we found no evidence of leaks or other issues. (In retrospect...) Finally, this morning at 8:30, joined by good friends, we trekked off to what is purported to be an unfinished and flooded missile silo, essentially a small quarry, for our first dive. The water was crystal clear, and the weather was beautiful. My expectation was that it would be a conservative first dive, but all of our secret hopes were to find wrecked cars or castoff bicycles and such, given that this place is a favorite hangout of the local teens in summer. Admittedly though, I had my doubts about the selection of our first location when I first surveyed the area and saw the gentle slope of shore turn into a stark horizon line not 15 feet away and I assumed that like any good missile silo the walls were vertical and that horizon line was a sheer drop. On the other-hand, we were in a pretty good position to find out. Not to mention-- what would we see? Like any first-run, we had our issues. Sequentially we were challenged by boot up issues, tether management and buoyancy problems capped off by the somewhat "spirit crushing" loss of our vertical thruster prop discovered as we were heading over the precipice fighting a descent I felt was too rapid for a first dive. (Clearly the blade was not properly counter-tightened during the build). But, not to be deterred we pulled off extra ballast, enough to make the ROV fully buoyant and practiced our navigation and camera work. We even managed to drive the ROV under a sheet of ice and capture some interesting footage (relatively speaking) of bubbles trapped under the ice sheet. In all we logged 45 minutes on our first dive and despite the setback of losing the prop I must admit, I am quite pleased. We are steep on the learning curve and loving every minute of it. Next steps: New prop, fine tune ballast, video footage management (extraction for playback and sharing) and set a date to head back to the silo.

6 Days of Flying back to back. Testing biometric sensor vest, and two sensors for pressure mapping of the wing. Jakob and I traveled the valley with our magical backpacks. I love Colombia.

The Anchovy is a simple, long range, deep sea R.O.V. costing (hopefully) under 200 dollars to make and build. It consits of a single piece of pvc with two end caps, 2 motors, a livestream video camera, a gopro, a ballast, some floodlight leds and a thether atached to a buey housing the rf module. Later versions may include depth sensors, gas sensors and other added electronics. Keep in mind this is all in the development stage so feel free to contact me with any questions or ideas at troutsub@gmail.com

Having updated the firmware, I was totally expecting my initial powering on of my OpenROV 2.8 to be only 75% functional based on my lack of experience with acrylic bonding and soldering. I was elated when Ioaded that batteries after assembly and it lit up! I was even able to connect to the cockpit with very little trouble as well having had some experience with IP networking. The only issues I noticed at first was that I had installed the camera upside down (the forum advised simply removing it and flipping around which was not too hard) and the starboard LED lights are dimmer on one side. I suspect my rookie soldering to be the root cause and I will look at this later. For a test run, I put the ROV in a 300 gallon hot tub (unheated) and was amazed that it flew as expected. It soon became apparent that my piloting skills will need some honing.

Back at the lab, been doing work troubleshooting my engines... One of my engines wasn't working right. Support suggested I update all the software and firmware and all that goodness in case there was something buggy. For good measure, I ordered some new engines along with SD card with the latest and greatest. The update process was less fraught than I expected, and I had the ROV back up and running pretty quickly. But alas it was to no avail, so I began the slightly tricker task of replacing the motor. In stripping wires, I managed to to rip one wire off of one engine -- luckily the order comes with a couple to spare. I much more carefully stripped the wires down and set up to solder the engine on. The starboard engine has the shortest wires, so the least slack to work with. Which was problematic because with my now rusty soldering skills, I managed to blow it on one connection (soldering quickly on those wires is important, because it's easy to overheat the wires and melt the plastic sheathing -- or, as it turned out in my case, one end of the plastic shrink tube that was to protect the connection). But it's on and back in place. And to my relief, the engine sounds more or less the same as the other -- so hopefully I'll be running in straight lines from here on out. I still can't tell why the original motor was bad. It doesn't appear to have any defects or anything stuck inside, so who knows. Now, I just need the rain to clear up a bit -- and I'll be out on the lake.

It's about time! If you didn't want to sit through hours of raw dive footage, here's the highlight video from our incredible adventure.

Our time in a Brazil with a fantastic group of students ended about a year ago, but we've been busy evaluating the program, improving the curriculum, and finding ways to tell the kids' stories. The highlights: 1) Our partners at USC's Rossier School of Education conducted an analysis of students' pre- and post-tests to show statistically significant educational gains following the Mars Academy program. Not only did the students learn about the scientific process, the ocean, and outer space, but they also demonstrated a greater sense of purpose and agency in improving their communities through science. 2) Hank and our film team have been hard at work on a feature-length documentary. Check out the extended trailer below! 3) We're planning future Mars Academy experiences for children around the world, so stay tuned for our next journey of exploratory education!

An interesting note. We've discovered that there is a Geocache hidden in the depths of the Lake that, until now, only certified scuba divers have been able to locate. Though we are divers as well, I am pretty sure no one has done geocaching with an ROV before. This is now an exploration target after we've checkout out our gear. From Blue Octopus Scuba: http://www.blueoctopusscuba.com/local/lake-phoenix** **"Certified Divers headed to Lake Phoenix for fun or skills practice should stop by the Admissions Desk and obtain a laminated map of the lake. There is a hidden underwater Geo Cache only reachable with SCUBA equipment, if you can find it. You'll have to plan your dives carefully to reach the Geo Cache and the mystery item..." One thing we didn't design for was salvage. Looks like we may have to rig up a gripper of some kind. Cache #GC2VPD7 From the geocaching.com: Geocache Description: "You must be a certified scuba diver to seek this cache located at Lake Rawlings Quarry in Rawlings, Va. Check in at the quarry. The cache is located at of the Mystery Boat (#11 on the quarry map). The site is not marked by a buoy so it is recommended to reference the map. The cache is a plastic box with DAN stickers on it. When you find the cache, sign the log secured to the top of the inside of the box. Take one of the FTF prizes and leave another trinket for future cache seekers. After you have found this cache, send us a photo of you with it and tell us the story of your adventure! " N 36° 56.984 W 077° 46.003 UTM: 18S E 253639 N 4092873** This is great fun. It also happens to be near the Blast Hole Whatever that is...We will find out!

The past month has been full of excitement. We have been scouring the coast for mesophotic coral ecosystems and have been successful. Explore and you will find! The most exciting element of our study is the prospect of researching and exploring depths that have been seen by a privileged few or no one at all. We were told that there wouldn't be much beyond 30 m here in the Philippines, but we now know that this is incorrect as the coral reefs continue beyond diving limits and tend to be intact and healthier the deeper one explores. Monstrous gorgonians continue to take our breath away. Our wifi connection is very limited here making it difficult to upload pictures (let alone videos), but we hope to upload more pictures of these beautiful environments so you may be able to see the richness we are experiencing every day thanks to OpenROV.

Here's the screenview video that Ingmar captured January 2nd from the cockpit. Cool to watch the controls as it maneuvers and navigates. I think we can ROV around the sculpture, Zoe, and through the reef balls (the cement orbs with holes in them) if we replace all the cable with the buoyant one. Next on our list is to find how and where to get some. Is it here in Mexico?

After a night of discussing forecasts, the collective group of pilots decided to attempt a Hike and Fly of Mt Tamalpais. At 7:15AM I was surprised by frost on my car and had to scrape it off!! in Mt View. I hope people covered their plants! Sail Tactics puts out a 1:00AM 2 day wind forecast and a 7:45AM day of which is ultra-high res at 200meters. The 1:00AM looked like there would be a flyable window from 9AM-2:30PM. I picked up Jon and headed to the Fire Station at Stinson Beach. As Pilots we have to sign in at Pan Toll Station first. Crossing the golden gate the observations matched the predictions with a less 5 knots to Light/Variable. Mt Tam. Offers views of the Farralon Islands, Point Reyes, Pacifica, and the Interior Bay including San Francisco, Angel Island and Mt Diablo. Basically the whole Bay! Over the last week the Area was impacted by a number of Storms, bringing rain and wind. Typically in the days following storms the air mass in unstable and flying conditions can be very good. Free Flight Lab is interested in capturing conservation data of the Lagoon. I plan to monitor and detect any possible Algae blooms and observe changes in the land due to tidal changes. Looking at the new forecast it seemed like the flyable window got shorter and the new wind came in sooner and stronger then the 2-day. The hike is beautiful. At Launch you could see some breeze start to spill over the point and fill in along Stinson beach. I believe in the forecast so I was prepared to Launch. As my friends made fun of my habit to launch early I saw birds and could feel the air. It was about to be time. I took off and was able to soar the faces near launch in the fresh breeze. The breath from the mountain changed and it was time to move on. I aimed for the next ridge, sunny faces, steep terrain, looking for shadows because on the hike we saw that the grass was still covered in frost. Thermal Gradients make for good thermal triggers. I was tricked into turning in a little bubble and the gains did not match the losses. Time to leave the ridge. At this point this line can be nerve racking, I chose to attempt to hook a thermal and now had to glide efficiently over the trees to the next ridge. I made it easily, but... without local knowledge it looks like there is no good way out if you get too low. Actually there is, but it not a great option. It would probably be fine, but not worth taking chances. Arriving at the Main Ridge I worked light bubbles along the shadow lines and tree lines.. Alternating sides as the mountain breathed. Finally at the last moment before pushing out to the beach... I hooked one, not a bubble but a nice continuous source of lift. Coring it to ~2600ft I was able to see the whole bay area. I flew over to where I launched, said Hi then proceeded to play in the sky with friends both hawks and pilots until my fingers froze! I took a flight path north to investigate the Lagoon. Floating along lifty lines I flew over coastal highway 1. For an hour I took to the skies flying on invisible elevators, and after landing on the beach I went up for seconds, this time as a Tandem Passenger to help a friend train, and look at the possibilities of flying passengers and equipment for Free Flight Lab. What a great day exploring a local Microclimate. We Flew from 11AM-2:30pm It ended up being a bit of a blend of both forecasts. The transitions and timing were spot on. Tomorrow Windy Hill.

The "Prospector" ROV undergoing testing and evaluation at Harvard Mine in Jamestown, CA. This will be the secondary unit operated in the expedition.

On our way back from Tahoe, we also stopped by the side of the road to do some under-ice flying in a river that feeds into the lake. The water was very shallow, and Trident was just barely able to fit between the ice and the bottom.

Shark alert! Leopard shark pups take a nibble on our squid baited hooks and we bring a few of them up! Our first data of the day :)

In this page you can find the articles of this expedition: http://www.barcoshundidosmexico.com/website/

My name is Jake Adams, a lifelong explorer of the marine environment, self taught and with a Bachelors in Marine Science. For the past decade I have been writing and reporting on all aspects of little traveled places. I am a coral 'expert', and everywhere I go I usually find new and unusual corals, photograph and document them for popular and academic audiences alike. I have been dreaming of going to Palau for my whole life, and next year I finally have the opportunity to visit this ecoregion at the mostcritical time. Each year, the January full moon is a time for many different species of iconic reef fish to gather in huge schools to participate in mass spawning events. I think this is an amazing opportunity to document this event from a unique perspective, and perhaps even document some unexpected behavior and animals with an OpenROV. Everywhere I go I stay with the people, the local communities who live near the marine environment and help them to develop sustainable forms of income, my favorite projects include consulting on coral farming efforts for reef restoration.

For this post, I would like to share the schedule of one mission day, so you can have an idea of what’s going on from the moment the alarm clock wakes us all to the time when we finally go to bed. We wake up usually at 7 am to prepare breakfast. At 8 am, we decided to start with an aerial prospection of the ancient harbor. In order to do so, we had first to put some markers along the shore so the archeologists can have several reference GPS points to have a geographical referenced 3D model and an orthophotoplan. For this, it is important to know that we use local products that we don’t have to transport in our luggage. The lighter we are, the better it is. As soon as we arrive somewhere on a mission, we spot quickly a tourist beach store and buy several colorful foam rollers. They are very convenient because first, they are really cheap. Then, you can cut them easily in small pieces and even a small piece float perfectly. After buying two of them in the city, we drove to the ancient site as early as possible. Here is the trick : if you wait too long, the sun is reflecting badly in the water and the aerial images are not usable for any kind of 3D because of the mirror effect (the sun is at the exact same position on each picture). At 9h30, we dispatched the markers first on the beach, then in the water. In order for the markers not to move in the water, we had to come up with an idea. The best we could find in the store were several pieces of rather rigid water hose on top of which we placed pieces of foam (see picture). Once our markers were set, we launched the drone in the air… to realize we were too late in the morning. The sun was already too high in the sky at about 10h30. At least our positioning markers were set for the following morning. At about 11 am, we were back at the marina to get ready to return to the quarry that is located at about 45 minutes from our small harbor with our sailing boat. We anchored at about 12h30. After a small snack, we jumped in our wetsuit and prepared our diving equipment. Diving at this period of the year (mid September) in Albania, you have to take into account that the sun light is too low already at about 4 pm. So, the best is to dive between 12:00 and 14:00. After 15:00 the light is seriously lacking. This dive went smoothly and Philippe managed to make the photo acquisition of the first underwater zone (20m by 30m) thanks to the guiding rope held by Christophe and Sebastien on each side of the rectangle. During the dive, Julien launched from the boat the drone in the air, to make the aerial photo acquisition of the area (see previous post). At about 15h30, everyone was back on board. At 16h30, we left our anchorage and arrived in our birth at about 17h15. At 18h00, Christophe was already compressing air in our 4 diving tanks (two 12 liters and two 10 liters) thanks to the small air compressor that our Albanian contact rented us. Chris will need between 1h30 and 2 hours to have them fully loaded for the following day. Philippe was copying and editing the underwater pictures of the day in the boat, while Sebastien and Margaux were preparing the deck of the boat for the following day. In the meantime, Antoine and Julien went straight to the house we rented on the harbor to start working on the 3D model (Julien) and the drawings of the day (Antoine). Margaux followed them to start cooking the dinner. At about 19h30, we realized that it was Margaux’ birthday !!! Damn, we almost forgot !!! So, Julien (who has started a 3D process) and Sebastien rushed in town to buy her a magnificent red Albanian T-shirt with the two black eagles. Back at the house at 20h30, we had a more than wonderful diner, thanks to our "cooking wizzard" Margaux, discussed about the weather for the next days (which is really important to us) and decided to return earlier to the lagoon the following morning. At about 23:00, we were exhausted, but the computer that was processing the 3D models was seriously bugging. After trying several things, we decided to shut it down for the night… At about midnight - 1:00 am, everyone was sleeping : Margaux and Christophe in the house, and Sebastien, Julien, Philippe and Antoine in the boat. It was now mosquitoes' time !!!

I look forward to using the OpenROV with more of my STEM that I am a part of including the USC Neighborhood Academic Initiative.

This is my second OpenROV dive at Lake Tenkiller in eastern Oklahoma. Tenkiller is a fresh water lake with relatively clear water and good visibility - good for diving.

Lake Tenkiller explorations

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